Give your average omelette a new life with this Japanese rolled omelette or tamagoyaki. This omelet is savory and sweet thanks to the added seasonings like dashi, soy sauce, miring and sugar. All the ingredients are simple and the hardest part is really rolling the omelet. This technique is a true art form of its own. And might seem incredibly hard but once you get a hold of it you will be making it in no time. You just need a little bit of practice.

All the added seasonings really amp up the flavors of the omelette. Umami rich dashi (Japanese stock made with kombu (kelp) and katsuobushi (bonito flakes)) make the taste complex and multidimensional, but not to strong and overpowering letting the egg taste shine through.

Soy sauce adds a savory note and sugar and mirin sweetness. The texture is also more airy and fluffier, almost pillow like, due to the added liquid in the egg mixture. And the omelet is juicy and never dry.

The more watery the egg mixture the harder it is to roll out. So start with just a couple of tablespoons of dashi increasing as you get better at rolling. The first two layers also do not need to be perfect shape since they are going to be on the inside. And make sure to oil the pan after each layer, it really helps with the omelette not sticking to it. Even if you are really tempted to use less oil, do not for the best results. The oil in the pan should be hot enough so that the eggs sizzle. Thin omelet layers will cook fast so you will need to roll fast as well. Just move the pan off the heat to adjust the temperature rather then trying to adjust the heat.

It is recommended to use a special rectangular tamagoyaki pan if you want to achieve authentic shape of the omelet, but this is an ideal scenario. You can absolutely use any round pan you have at home as long as you are not too worried about the omelet being the perfect shape. Non sticks pans work the best. This delicious and extra flavorful omelette is a wonderful breakfast or lunch choice. Hope you enjoy it.